Episode 83: 2010 General Relief Society Meeting

Zilpha Larsen, Chris, Melanny, Melissa, review the General Relief Society Meeting held on September 25th, 2010.

Episode 83

48 comments on “Episode 83: 2010 General Relief Society Meeting”

  1. Swearing Elder Reply

    I loved Zilpha’s history and analysis of the Relief Society conference meeting to start off the podcast. That was excellent!

    I noticed in a photo of the meeting (in the SL Trib) that the podium was quite bare. I find that disturbing on two levels a) that “The Brethren”couldn’t bother to show up for the women’s meeting, and b)that women aren’t, in fact, the only ones on the stand presiding over a women’s meeting (and that the stand isn’t full of qualified women).

    Actually, I find the latter more disturbing.

    • Glenn Reply

      If you were looking with your spiritual eyes you would see a host of female angels up there on the stand: all of the great pioneer women, a few of our heavenly mothers, and a couple of exalted dead babies. That’s why the theme was “look back” — code language for those hearing with spiritual ears.

      • Swearing Elder Reply

        Yeah, I need a new prescription for my spirichual eyes.

        One more point I meant to make: I thoroughly enjoyed the all-women panel. Even if the R.S. can’t have an all-women general meeting, they can have an all-women panel to analyze it.

        I also think a panel on the history of the R.S. would be great. (Spoiler alert: It’s also tied to the priesthood. 🙁 )

  2. Swearing Elder Reply

    I loved Zilpha’s history and analysis of the Relief Society conference meeting to start off the podcast. That was excellent!

    I noticed in a photo of the meeting (in the SL Trib) that the podium was quite bare. I find that disturbing on two levels a) that “The Brethren”couldn’t bother to show up for the women’s meeting, and b)that women aren’t, in fact, the only ones on the stand presiding over a women’s meeting (and that the stand isn’t full of qualified women).

    Actually, I find the latter more disturbing.

    • Glenn Reply

      If you were looking with your spiritual eyes you would see a host of female angels up there on the stand: all of the great pioneer women, a few of our heavenly mothers, and a couple of exalted dead babies. That’s why the theme was “look back” — code language for those hearing with spiritual ears.

      • Swearing Elder Reply

        Yeah, I need a new prescription for my spirichual eyes.

        One more point I meant to make: I thoroughly enjoyed the all-women panel. Even if the R.S. can’t have an all-women general meeting, they can have an all-women panel to analyze it.

        I also think a panel on the history of the R.S. would be great. (Spoiler alert: It’s also tied to the priesthood. 🙁 )

  3. Wes Cauthers Reply

    Great episode, ladies. From your analysis, it sounds like the psychology of LDS, Inc. is alive and well in the relief society. Guilt, pressure, manipulation, obligation. I pretty much agreed with everything you all said. The story about the babies who died on the way to the temple was classic Mormon manipulation by way of emotion (aka “the spirit”). Would love to hear more all-female podcasts!

  4. Wes Cauthers Reply

    Great episode, ladies. From your analysis, it sounds like the psychology of LDS, Inc. is alive and well in the relief society. Guilt, pressure, manipulation, obligation. I pretty much agreed with everything you all said. The story about the babies who died on the way to the temple was classic Mormon manipulation by way of emotion (aka “the spirit”). Would love to hear more all-female podcasts!

  5. Donna Reply

    Enjoyed this podcast. It was pointed out many times, that there are many women who look forward to this annual broadcast, who are just waiting to hear what their leaders have to say, that go to these meetings, with an open heart and mind…thirsty for information, inspiration and leadership…but leave parched, bored and disappointed.

    We give so much to the church. We don’t need any other heroes in our lives besides ourselves..and we don’t need an LDS Oprah, but it would be nice to not hear the same old messages…with the same old rhetoric..basically, your happiness will come through your husband and children. Your faithfulness is needed. et etc.

    I know that the message must be general, but the irony is, in validating individuals, we all get validated. We will listen and find the message that we need as we are inspired and uplifted. Share scriptures, give us the truth of the history of Mormon Women.

    Link us all together with Faith, Hope and Charity. It is not inspiring to talk of Satan, morality and how us being better mothers are going to save the whole world…

    inspire us and we will feel the hope we need to make it through all our daily challenges. Encourage us as women to live up to our potential, as women, including all the other ways besides mothering. This will not lead women away into the world,

    it will make LDS women brighter and stronger.

  6. Donna Reply

    Enjoyed this podcast. It was pointed out many times, that there are many women who look forward to this annual broadcast, who are just waiting to hear what their leaders have to say, that go to these meetings, with an open heart and mind…thirsty for information, inspiration and leadership…but leave parched, bored and disappointed.

    We give so much to the church. We don’t need any other heroes in our lives besides ourselves..and we don’t need an LDS Oprah, but it would be nice to not hear the same old messages…with the same old rhetoric..basically, your happiness will come through your husband and children. Your faithfulness is needed. et etc.

    I know that the message must be general, but the irony is, in validating individuals, we all get validated. We will listen and find the message that we need as we are inspired and uplifted. Share scriptures, give us the truth of the history of Mormon Women.

    Link us all together with Faith, Hope and Charity. It is not inspiring to talk of Satan, morality and how us being better mothers are going to save the whole world…

    inspire us and we will feel the hope we need to make it through all our daily challenges. Encourage us as women to live up to our potential, as women, including all the other ways besides mothering. This will not lead women away into the world,

    it will make LDS women brighter and stronger.

  7. Nathan R Kennard Reply

    Great discussion. Thanks for leading this Zilpha. I often wondered what they talked about in those meetings.

    The Mormon church owes much to women but I do not remember seeing institutional acknowledgment of this in the last 30 years. In fact, having been raised in Mormon culture, I am uncertain what that would even look like.

    • Nathan R Kennard Reply

      Another classic statement came at about 33:30 when Chris describing the situation of mothers whose children, though raised properly, choose to leave, “epic fail”. No wonder some of these women feel sad. Sometimes it seems that Mormon rhetoric reinforces a dissonant point of view: you have agency (to choose right), if mothers choose right – children who leave will return (overriding child’s agency?), return may not happen until the next life (apparent failure of promise of return).

  8. Nathan R Kennard Reply

    Great discussion. Thanks for leading this Zilpha. I often wondered what they talked about in those meetings.

    The Mormon church owes much to women but I do not remember seeing institutional acknowledgment of this in the last 30 years. In fact, having been raised in Mormon culture, I am uncertain what that would even look like.

    • Nathan R Kennard Reply

      Another classic statement came at about 33:30 when Chris describing the situation of mothers whose children, though raised properly, choose to leave, “epic fail”. No wonder some of these women feel sad. Sometimes it seems that Mormon rhetoric reinforces a dissonant point of view: you have agency (to choose right), if mothers choose right – children who leave will return (overriding child’s agency?), return may not happen until the next life (apparent failure of promise of return).

  9. jax Reply

    This one will go down as one of my favorites for sure! And, yes, please have the discussion (with THIS group) on the history of the Relief Society.
    Thanks to each of you for your thoughtful analysis.

    I wanted to share something briefly. Years ago I attended a leadership conference where Sheri Dew was the key speaker. The takeaway I got from that conference was this: The Relief Society exists to support the Priesthood in its mission to bring souls unto Christ. Period.

    If you have access to a leadership manual, the purpose of the Relief Society is spelled out in the very beginning with 6 objectives. Each falls under the ultimate purpose or assisting the Priesthood. Sister Dew was clear to point out that the Relief Society had no other purpose separate from that. She was adamant that the ward and stake leadership never forget that everything falls under the bishop’s direction; the priesthood trumps everyone including the general RS leadership.

    I have never looked at Relief Society the same since. Listening to this reminded me of the disappointment I felt, even in my most TBM days. Nothing could belong just to the women. Everywhere you look there is another reminder of the inferior state of the women in the church. I didn’t have the right words to express that disappointment until years later, but I felt it keenly.

    And you are right, I love the women in the church. They are among the most giving and loving in the world. I wish their organization could be entrusted wholly to them.

    Stephanie

  10. jax Reply

    This one will go down as one of my favorites for sure! And, yes, please have the discussion (with THIS group) on the history of the Relief Society.
    Thanks to each of you for your thoughtful analysis.

    I wanted to share something briefly. Years ago I attended a leadership conference where Sheri Dew was the key speaker. The takeaway I got from that conference was this: The Relief Society exists to support the Priesthood in its mission to bring souls unto Christ. Period.

    If you have access to a leadership manual, the purpose of the Relief Society is spelled out in the very beginning with 6 objectives. Each falls under the ultimate purpose or assisting the Priesthood. Sister Dew was clear to point out that the Relief Society had no other purpose separate from that. She was adamant that the ward and stake leadership never forget that everything falls under the bishop’s direction; the priesthood trumps everyone including the general RS leadership.

    I have never looked at Relief Society the same since. Listening to this reminded me of the disappointment I felt, even in my most TBM days. Nothing could belong just to the women. Everywhere you look there is another reminder of the inferior state of the women in the church. I didn’t have the right words to express that disappointment until years later, but I felt it keenly.

    And you are right, I love the women in the church. They are among the most giving and loving in the world. I wish their organization could be entrusted wholly to them.

    Stephanie

  11. duncan Reply

    Great session! Thanks for your sharing your conversation.

    One thought:

    President Monson: When the Mormon church stops focusing on how good Mormons are suppose to look then the messages of not judging will have much more power.

    Do you think he reads this blog? I’m sure he does.

  12. duncan Reply

    Great session! Thanks for your sharing your conversation.

    One thought:

    President Monson: When the Mormon church stops focusing on how good Mormons are suppose to look then the messages of not judging will have much more power.

    Do you think he reads this blog? I’m sure he does.

  13. James Hafen Reply

    One of the first topics discussed was the ‘straw man’ argument of never being able to do enough. And while this is a straw man argument in comparison to the other two “issues” discussed in the talk, I think this is a major problem in the church and part of what ultimately drove me into relative disassociation. I always felt a constant pang of guilt at conferences and SM and in bishopric meetings – even when reading the silly church magazines or attending SS. It’s driven into us all, men and women alike, to do more. It’s not about the atonement and Christ making up the difference, IMHO, it’s about the fact that the church demands so much time and enough is never enough. Good is never good enough. 3 hour block meetings, leadership meetings, YM/YW, go to the temple, do family history, attend another stake training, take off a week of your vacation to attend scout camp and/OR girls camp, give more tithing, give more fast offering, then turn around and donate to scouting and fundraisers, don’t forget your HT/VT. RS meetings. Special PH meetings early Sunday morning. Scripture study. FHE. It goes on and on and on and despite how much you give and do, you still get the reward of sitting in front of your TV twice a year to watch the leaders of the church stand up and tell you to do more.

    Enough.

    Enough.

    • kaylanamars Reply

      Yup…that’s what struck me in this discussion. I always felt horrible even when I was a TBM…I hated reading the Ensign, listening to conference or going to RS. It’s the same old shtick. Do your best, but how do you know what’s your best…because you can always do better. Nothing is ever enough.

      If you don’t have kids then you need to have one, then once you have one, then it’s time for another, etc. Always magnify those callings.

      Then when I didn’t fit that mold of the perfect woman and mother..like I never ever desired to have a kid or never felt uplifted by the same old rhetoric. Or wanting to have something else in my life besides being a wife and mother…I always just felt like it was never good enough and that did include never measuring up to God’s standards because he was supposedly the big guy in charge giving the leaders the info.

      Yeah, it’s still pretty raw. If I had sat through that, I don’t think I would’ve found anything really praiseworthy!

      Also the story of the deaths of the two children! I would’ve been livid had I heard that. That’s horrific and manipulative. Yikes.

      Anyway, thank you Zilpha and company for watching so I didn’t have to and for your wonderful words of insight! You ladies rock!

  14. James Hafen Reply

    One of the first topics discussed was the ‘straw man’ argument of never being able to do enough. And while this is a straw man argument in comparison to the other two “issues” discussed in the talk, I think this is a major problem in the church and part of what ultimately drove me into relative disassociation. I always felt a constant pang of guilt at conferences and SM and in bishopric meetings – even when reading the silly church magazines or attending SS. It’s driven into us all, men and women alike, to do more. It’s not about the atonement and Christ making up the difference, IMHO, it’s about the fact that the church demands so much time and enough is never enough. Good is never good enough. 3 hour block meetings, leadership meetings, YM/YW, go to the temple, do family history, attend another stake training, take off a week of your vacation to attend scout camp and/OR girls camp, give more tithing, give more fast offering, then turn around and donate to scouting and fundraisers, don’t forget your HT/VT. RS meetings. Special PH meetings early Sunday morning. Scripture study. FHE. It goes on and on and on and despite how much you give and do, you still get the reward of sitting in front of your TV twice a year to watch the leaders of the church stand up and tell you to do more.

    Enough.

    Enough.

    • kaylanamars Reply

      Yup…that’s what struck me in this discussion. I always felt horrible even when I was a TBM…I hated reading the Ensign, listening to conference or going to RS. It’s the same old shtick. Do your best, but how do you know what’s your best…because you can always do better. Nothing is ever enough.

      If you don’t have kids then you need to have one, then once you have one, then it’s time for another, etc. Always magnify those callings.

      Then when I didn’t fit that mold of the perfect woman and mother..like I never ever desired to have a kid or never felt uplifted by the same old rhetoric. Or wanting to have something else in my life besides being a wife and mother…I always just felt like it was never good enough and that did include never measuring up to God’s standards because he was supposedly the big guy in charge giving the leaders the info.

      Yeah, it’s still pretty raw. If I had sat through that, I don’t think I would’ve found anything really praiseworthy!

      Also the story of the deaths of the two children! I would’ve been livid had I heard that. That’s horrific and manipulative. Yikes.

      Anyway, thank you Zilpha and company for watching so I didn’t have to and for your wonderful words of insight! You ladies rock!

  15. Eric Reply

    I loved the all women panel in this podcast. Besides Nyle I’m not sure I have heard any of the other panel members speak so directly about what they did not like in this conference. I’m sure the guys have been direct too but it was so much fun to listen to the venting in this podcast. It was therapeutic just to listen to this discussion. My wife and I were both laughing out loud on several occasions. I can’t wait to hear the analysis of the General Conference, especially since I can’t stand to watch it my self. Not yet anyway.

  16. Eric Reply

    I loved the all women panel in this podcast. Besides Nyle I’m not sure I have heard any of the other panel members speak so directly about what they did not like in this conference. I’m sure the guys have been direct too but it was so much fun to listen to the venting in this podcast. It was therapeutic just to listen to this discussion. My wife and I were both laughing out loud on several occasions. I can’t wait to hear the analysis of the General Conference, especially since I can’t stand to watch it my self. Not yet anyway.

  17. Persephone Reply

    I really enjoyed this discussion. How therapeutic it would have been to be part of conversations like these when I was still a true believer. To be able to openly dissect the message and identify the nuggets of wisdom while recognizing other components of the message as not useful (perhaps even detrimental) or pure emotional manipulation, and then accept only what felt right to me, would have been much more beneficial. There were always things I was uncomfortable with (on many levels), and to have been able to give a voice to those feelings, figure out what about them I did not agree with and let them go, would have been so much healthier than repressing those concerns and carrying the guilt of not being “faithful enough” to feel the “truthfulness” in everything my leaders said. And although I no longer believe, it is still very therapeutic to hear others have this discussion. I am so in love with honesty, and full disclosure, in a way that I was never allowed to be before. Thanks for the interesting conversation! I look forward to more.

  18. Persephone Reply

    I really enjoyed this discussion. How therapeutic it would have been to be part of conversations like these when I was still a true believer. To be able to openly dissect the message and identify the nuggets of wisdom while recognizing other components of the message as not useful (perhaps even detrimental) or pure emotional manipulation, and then accept only what felt right to me, would have been much more beneficial. There were always things I was uncomfortable with (on many levels), and to have been able to give a voice to those feelings, figure out what about them I did not agree with and let them go, would have been so much healthier than repressing those concerns and carrying the guilt of not being “faithful enough” to feel the “truthfulness” in everything my leaders said. And although I no longer believe, it is still very therapeutic to hear others have this discussion. I am so in love with honesty, and full disclosure, in a way that I was never allowed to be before. Thanks for the interesting conversation! I look forward to more.

  19. Oz Reply

    For girls, you did a great job! LOL That’s a joke…this was a great podcast, excellent work. And hope to hear more episodes featuring each of you together again.

    Everyone don’t kill me on this…besides the obvious verbal goofs that each of these speakers gave us, I actually thought that each of the talks were really good. I thought they were really sincere, for once. Although my only comparison is to Sisters that have spoken in GC and Sisters from my Mission, I really felt that these ladies were really sincere. I know President Monson focus was on “not judgeing” each other, I was inspired by his message of Charity to others. That’s something my wife and I want to emphasize to our young daughters. I thought it was a great message. At the same time I was laughing along with him as he told stories of how women in the church can be so mean to each other…I kept thinking of Elna Bakers book and her description of that Sister who’s smiling at you while looking you up and down.

    The Relief Society history book should be interesting. The ladies were right on point, “which history are they going to talk about?.” Hopefully they add the part where President Emma Smith throws her Secretary Eliza R. Snow down the stairs of the Mansion House…allegedly!!! Or the part when President Smith announces in Relief Society that “heinious sins were among us, that much of this iniquity (polygamy)was practiced by some in authority pretending to be santioned by President Smith.” I’m sure that went over well with each of those young women who were secretly approached by members of the Twelve and Joseph himself. Hopefully there will be good commentary in this history book about that event.

    Excellent Job Ladies!!!!

  20. Oz Reply

    For girls, you did a great job! LOL That’s a joke…this was a great podcast, excellent work. And hope to hear more episodes featuring each of you together again.

    Everyone don’t kill me on this…besides the obvious verbal goofs that each of these speakers gave us, I actually thought that each of the talks were really good. I thought they were really sincere, for once. Although my only comparison is to Sisters that have spoken in GC and Sisters from my Mission, I really felt that these ladies were really sincere. I know President Monson focus was on “not judgeing” each other, I was inspired by his message of Charity to others. That’s something my wife and I want to emphasize to our young daughters. I thought it was a great message. At the same time I was laughing along with him as he told stories of how women in the church can be so mean to each other…I kept thinking of Elna Bakers book and her description of that Sister who’s smiling at you while looking you up and down.

    The Relief Society history book should be interesting. The ladies were right on point, “which history are they going to talk about?.” Hopefully they add the part where President Emma Smith throws her Secretary Eliza R. Snow down the stairs of the Mansion House…allegedly!!! Or the part when President Smith announces in Relief Society that “heinious sins were among us, that much of this iniquity (polygamy)was practiced by some in authority pretending to be santioned by President Smith.” I’m sure that went over well with each of those young women who were secretly approached by members of the Twelve and Joseph himself. Hopefully there will be good commentary in this history book about that event.

    Excellent Job Ladies!!!!

  21. Joseph Reply

    Great episode! For what it is worth, I think Pres. Monson often refers to “my beloved Francis” (if I remember correctly and guess the spelling right). I do not think all of his ego-centrism (or chauvinism, while we are on the subject) is conscious. You really nailed him on stealing credit for the turkeys, though. Ouch.

  22. Joseph Reply

    Great episode! For what it is worth, I think Pres. Monson often refers to “my beloved Francis” (if I remember correctly and guess the spelling right). I do not think all of his ego-centrism (or chauvinism, while we are on the subject) is conscious. You really nailed him on stealing credit for the turkeys, though. Ouch.

  23. Nonny Reply

    This was a great review. I loved hearing women’s voices! Maybe I am not paying attention anymore, but I didn’t realize there would be a women’s conference. LOL I probably wouldn’t have attended anyway. Now I feel I know just what I missed. As I was listening I was wishing the RS meetings could have a frank discussion such as this. Then at the end one of the panelists expressed the same thought. It might even be worth attending the conference just to be able to participate in one of these discussions. Thanks sisters.

  24. Nonny Reply

    This was a great review. I loved hearing women’s voices! Maybe I am not paying attention anymore, but I didn’t realize there would be a women’s conference. LOL I probably wouldn’t have attended anyway. Now I feel I know just what I missed. As I was listening I was wishing the RS meetings could have a frank discussion such as this. Then at the end one of the panelists expressed the same thought. It might even be worth attending the conference just to be able to participate in one of these discussions. Thanks sisters.

  25. Brett Reply

    I benefit from hearing multiple perspectives and look forward to the reflections and commentaries about General Conference. I live outside the US and appreciate the richness provided by efforts like those of Mormon Expression. There are many latter-day saints that are not having the experiences of those in larger Mormon centers. So we benefit from people who represent a variety of Mormon (and former Mormon) experience.

    I began by listening to the General Relief Society Meeting podcast with Zilpha, Chris, Melanny, and Melissa. It was disappointing. Although I don’t know any of these obviously thoughtful individuals, they contributed very little to a helpful dialogue. (Of course, this is only my opinion).

    To make it a stronger podacst for me and the growing number of members, nonmembers (I don’t like that term), and former members outside the Mormon center places who are listening and reading to broader messages, I would consider:

    1. Being less sarcastic. Sarcasm doesn’t translate well and it diminishes the impact.

    2. Do more homework. Know who people like Sylvia Allred are and why they are interesting figures in the constellation of LDS leaders.

    3. Be less repetative (which was often done with sarcasm). Why the ongoing jabs at “history” and “looking backward”? Several good points were made about “faithful history”, but a nonmember friend who listened to the podcast with me asked, “Why are they so negative about history–even an imperfect one? I thought Mormons had a different take on the value of history.” I assume that the podcast participants actually appreciate history but that for some reason they just repeatdely referred to it in dismissive and catty ways.

    4. Be inclusive of additional perspectives. One of the reasons we listen to these types of podcasts and read these websites is to hear additional and complementary voices that help add to a deeper, richer theology and spiritual life. This podacst was (nearly) as monotone and one-note as a gospel doctrine class. It was a similar unbalanced diet. It can be much more than that (and often is). The feminist advocate (is that Melanny? Melissa?) brought some welcome and thoughtful reflection and insight. But as a whole it was too much of the same things being said in essentially the same way over and over.

    5. This will sound didactic, but podcasts like this would benefit from some additional humility, curiosity, and empathy. By humility I merely mean a more demonstrable openniness to other needs and interpretations. (A few references were made about women around the world with different –Yes! Pursue this! Be open and respectful and curious about this!) By curiosity I mean that it may be more effective to sound less smug and ask more questions. To wonder more. And by empathy I am suggesting that you model one of the great Mormon deficiencies: a welcomed and respected space for a broader range of ideas and life experiences.

    The friend I listened to the podcast with knows that I don’t “fit” particularly well with mainstream, Western, American Mormonism. “But if this is the alternative, maybe there’s no place you DO fit,” she added, referring to her generally and unexpectedly negative reaction to this podcast.

    More and better is possible.

  26. Brett Reply

    I benefit from hearing multiple perspectives and look forward to the reflections and commentaries about General Conference. I live outside the US and appreciate the richness provided by efforts like those of Mormon Expression. There are many latter-day saints that are not having the experiences of those in larger Mormon centers. So we benefit from people who represent a variety of Mormon (and former Mormon) experience.

    I began by listening to the General Relief Society Meeting podcast with Zilpha, Chris, Melanny, and Melissa. It was disappointing. Although I don’t know any of these obviously thoughtful individuals, they contributed very little to a helpful dialogue. (Of course, this is only my opinion).

    To make it a stronger podacst for me and the growing number of members, nonmembers (I don’t like that term), and former members outside the Mormon center places who are listening and reading to broader messages, I would consider:

    1. Being less sarcastic. Sarcasm doesn’t translate well and it diminishes the impact.

    2. Do more homework. Know who people like Sylvia Allred are and why they are interesting figures in the constellation of LDS leaders.

    3. Be less repetative (which was often done with sarcasm). Why the ongoing jabs at “history” and “looking backward”? Several good points were made about “faithful history”, but a nonmember friend who listened to the podcast with me asked, “Why are they so negative about history–even an imperfect one? I thought Mormons had a different take on the value of history.” I assume that the podcast participants actually appreciate history but that for some reason they just repeatdely referred to it in dismissive and catty ways.

    4. Be inclusive of additional perspectives. One of the reasons we listen to these types of podcasts and read these websites is to hear additional and complementary voices that help add to a deeper, richer theology and spiritual life. This podacst was (nearly) as monotone and one-note as a gospel doctrine class. It was a similar unbalanced diet. It can be much more than that (and often is). The feminist advocate (is that Melanny? Melissa?) brought some welcome and thoughtful reflection and insight. But as a whole it was too much of the same things being said in essentially the same way over and over.

    5. This will sound didactic, but podcasts like this would benefit from some additional humility, curiosity, and empathy. By humility I merely mean a more demonstrable openniness to other needs and interpretations. (A few references were made about women around the world with different –Yes! Pursue this! Be open and respectful and curious about this!) By curiosity I mean that it may be more effective to sound less smug and ask more questions. To wonder more. And by empathy I am suggesting that you model one of the great Mormon deficiencies: a welcomed and respected space for a broader range of ideas and life experiences.

    The friend I listened to the podcast with knows that I don’t “fit” particularly well with mainstream, Western, American Mormonism. “But if this is the alternative, maybe there’s no place you DO fit,” she added, referring to her generally and unexpectedly negative reaction to this podcast.

    More and better is possible.

  27. Abner Doon Reply

    As always, I enjoyed this episode. I very much agree with the panelist who said that it would be great if we could have these kinds of discussions with other members of the church after conference sessions. It’s really unfortunate that any such discussion would immediately be squelched when the slightest criticism was expressed.

    If I could make one request for the panelists, it would be for someone to summarize the stories you’re commenting about before sharing your responses. Most of us won’t have listened to the conference, so as a listener I was confused a few times when comments were being made along the lines of “I really disliked the story about ____” and it wasn’t always clear which story was being referred to, and why it was objectionable. Not a biggie, but it would help keep us in the loop.

    Anyway, keep it up, I really appreciate your podcast.

  28. Abner Doon Reply

    As always, I enjoyed this episode. I very much agree with the panelist who said that it would be great if we could have these kinds of discussions with other members of the church after conference sessions. It’s really unfortunate that any such discussion would immediately be squelched when the slightest criticism was expressed.

    If I could make one request for the panelists, it would be for someone to summarize the stories you’re commenting about before sharing your responses. Most of us won’t have listened to the conference, so as a listener I was confused a few times when comments were being made along the lines of “I really disliked the story about ____” and it wasn’t always clear which story was being referred to, and why it was objectionable. Not a biggie, but it would help keep us in the loop.

    Anyway, keep it up, I really appreciate your podcast.

  29. Pingback: Main Street Plaza » Sunday in Outer Blogness: (too much) heart and brains edition!

  30. Fred Reply

    Ladies this was absolutely fantastic! This has to be one of the best Mormon Expression podcasts to date IMO.

  31. Rosa Reply

    I met a gal by the name of Erika at Joanns just the other day and we chatted and she gave me her tel number. I was going to give her a pattern she was interested in. The number she gave me was not the correct number and I wouldn’t want her to think I forgot about her. Is there anyone there by that name? She said she is German and had an accent. You could call me at 952 0902

  32. Sophshepherd Reply

    I’m in love with these women on the podcast! I agree with you all in so many areas I can’t believe it. How refreshing!!! Bravo Sisters!!

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