Episode 118a: Polygamy Manifesto for Dummies Part 1

John Larsen, Glenn Ostlund, Tom Perry and Rich discuss the Manifesto.
Episode 118a

19 comments on “Episode 118a: Polygamy Manifesto for Dummies Part 1”

  1. Lstevenkimball Reply

    Polygamy and even polyandry in America started with the Cochranites. JS and early missionary contact with this small group led JS to ponder polygamy. Many Cochranites were converted as early Mormons at the time when JS began taking more wives. If you read about these people you gain a lot of insight into how enticing their sexual practices were to early LDS leaders. These people are the ONLY reason that JS ever “prayed and pondered” polygamy.

      • Lstevekimball Reply

        As early as 1832, Mormon missionaries were laboring successfully to make converts among Maine’s followers of polygamist religious leader Jacob Cochran, who went into hiding in 1830 to escape imprisonment due to his practice of polygamy. Among Cochran’s marital innovations was ‘spiritual wifery’, and “tradition assumes that (Cochran) received frequent consignments of spiritual consorts, and that such were invariably the most robust and attractive women in the community”.[2] The majority of what became the Quorum of the Twelve in 1835 attended Mormon conferences held in the center of the Cochranites in 1834 and 1835.[3][4][5][6] Brigham Young, an apostle in the Twelve, was acquainted with Cochran’s followers as he made several missionary journeys through the Cochranite territory from Boston to Saco,[7] and later married Augusta Adams Cobb, a former Cochranite.[8][9]

      • Lstevekimball Reply

        As early as 1832, Mormon missionaries were laboring successfully to make converts among Maine’s followers of polygamist religious leader Jacob Cochran, who went into hiding in 1830 to escape imprisonment due to his practice of polygamy. Among Cochran’s marital innovations was ‘spiritual wifery’, and “tradition assumes that (Cochran) received frequent consignments of spiritual consorts, and that such were invariably the most robust and attractive women in the community”.[2] The majority of what became the Quorum of the Twelve in 1835 attended Mormon conferences held in the center of the Cochranites in 1834 and 1835.[3][4][5][6] Brigham Young, an apostle in the Twelve, was acquainted with Cochran’s followers as he made several missionary journeys through the Cochranite territory from Boston to Saco,[7] and later married Augusta Adams Cobb, a former Cochranite.[8][9]

      • Lstevekimball Reply

        As early as 1832, Mormon missionaries were laboring successfully to make converts among Maine’s followers of polygamist religious leader Jacob Cochran, who went into hiding in 1830 to escape imprisonment due to his practice of polygamy. Among Cochran’s marital innovations was ‘spiritual wifery’, and “tradition assumes that (Cochran) received frequent consignments of spiritual consorts, and that such were invariably the most robust and attractive women in the community”.[2] The majority of what became the Quorum of the Twelve in 1835 attended Mormon conferences held in the center of the Cochranites in 1834 and 1835.[3][4][5][6] Brigham Young, an apostle in the Twelve, was acquainted with Cochran’s followers as he made several missionary journeys through the Cochranite territory from Boston to Saco,[7] and later married Augusta Adams Cobb, a former Cochranite.[8][9]

      • Lstevekimball Reply

        As early as 1832, Mormon missionaries were laboring successfully to make converts among Maine’s followers of polygamist religious leader Jacob Cochran, who went into hiding in 1830 to escape imprisonment due to his practice of polygamy. Among Cochran’s marital innovations was ‘spiritual wifery’, and “tradition assumes that (Cochran) received frequent consignments of spiritual consorts, and that such were invariably the most robust and attractive women in the community”.[2] The majority of what became the Quorum of the Twelve in 1835 attended Mormon conferences held in the center of the Cochranites in 1834 and 1835.[3][4][5][6] Brigham Young, an apostle in the Twelve, was acquainted with Cochran’s followers as he made several missionary journeys through the Cochranite territory from Boston to Saco,[7] and later married Augusta Adams Cobb, a former Cochranite.[8][9]

      • Lstevekimball Reply

        As early as 1832, Mormon missionaries were laboring successfully to make converts among Maine’s followers of polygamist religious leader Jacob Cochran, who went into hiding in 1830 to escape imprisonment due to his practice of polygamy. Among Cochran’s marital innovations was ‘spiritual wifery’, and “tradition assumes that (Cochran) received frequent consignments of spiritual consorts, and that such were invariably the most robust and attractive women in the community”.[2] The majority of what became the Quorum of the Twelve in 1835 attended Mormon conferences held in the center of the Cochranites in 1834 and 1835.[3][4][5][6] Brigham Young, an apostle in the Twelve, was acquainted with Cochran’s followers as he made several missionary journeys through the Cochranite territory from Boston to Saco,[7] and later married Augusta Adams Cobb, a former Cochranite.[8][9]

  2. Jeanmarie Todd Reply

    This was a fascinating discussion, but I’m dumbfounded that you could have roughly 2 hours of discussion on polygamy without involving any women (at least that I could hear). Seriously, folks, no one thought of this? Still, keep up the good work.

    • Anonymous Reply

      Why do you suppose that women would necessarily understand polygamy any more than men? I can understand if you had chided us for not having any polygamists on board, but why the sexism?

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  4. Scotty Reply

    the church still practices polygamy because it believes in polygamy?  I thought there was a difference in believe and practice.  I can believe a lot of things and practice none of them.  Just because I believe something doesn’t mean I practice it.

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